Category Archives: Uncategorized

February 2017: the Horsehead and the Flame nebulae

ok, I admit it. This is one of my favorite targets. The inspiring horsehead. I had imaged it with my 8″ LX200, but I wanted to try with the new setuo, with its bigger FOV.

Here we are, together with the Flame. The bright star is Alnitak, a magnitude 2 beast, which floods the image with its powerful light. This imposes some challenges for the processing tasks.

This image is a cropped version. Original one is even wider. But it seems that my alignment was not quite good that day, and some field rotation is shown in the original one.

Hosehead cropped signed

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January 2017: the Rosette

This is one of the beauties of the winter skies. I confess that, for one or another reason, I hadn’t imaged it before. The fate wanted that in the first ocasion that I’ve tried, a group of thin clouds invaded a transparent sky, and spoiled my session with the beauty.

As a result, this image has much more noise than I wanted. The first subs are very good, but the following ones were damaged by the appearing clouds. I needed all the subs to combine them, as my session had to finish when the sky got totally covered. Well, this encourages me to try again :-)

Rosetta cropped signed

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January 2017: Orion Nebula & the Pleiades

Well, these are easy targets. But I wanted to test my new setup with them , and the night I had free to do so the Moon didn’t allow for a much more complicated objects.

This is the Oriuon Nebula, M42. The large FOV of my setup is great for this object, as it frames the whole nebula and its surroundings.

M42 signed

This is a cropped version of it:

M42 cropped signed

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And now the Pleiades cluster, M45. Also framed pretty well. As you see the faint nebulosity is clearly captured. This is a cropped version:

pleiades cropped signat

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July 2014: M106

After some time without imaging (I’m very busy with my astrophysics master program), I came back to my CCD with this galaxy. The imaging session was abruptly terminated when some high clouds had my star guide lost. I could only cath 3 subs for each filter. Althpugh I used 500-second exposures for my subs, this was not enough to clearly uncover the weak and subtle external parts of this beautiful spiral. I trued to do my best while processing, to extract light from this area. As always, deconvolution worked miracles on the central part of the galaxy.

M106

 

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April 2014… with the 1,5m telescope at OSN!

Yes! My colleagues (Sara, Javi, Gunther, Erik) and I had the chance to remotely use, for three nights in a row, the telescopes of the Observatorio de Sierra Nevada. This observatory, which is almost 3.000m high up in the mountains, has two big, professional telescopes (90 and 150 cms). It is  not usual for this kind of observatories to allow use to non-professionals, but this was a remarkable exception thanks to the Valencian International University in which we are currently developing a astronomy and astrophysics master program. We were brightly assisted by the staff at OSN.

We used our nights for some science projects, and had time to image some wonders of the sky. Working at bin2x2, we were at a theoretical 0,46 arcsec/pixel  scale, limited in fact by the seeing. With a FOV of only 8 arcmin, the 1024X1024 pixels of the VersArray CCD delivered an extraordinary amount of information, so we aimed at tiny but interesting objects.

M97, the Owl Nebula (narrowband), and M82 with its supernova SN2014J were two of these objects:

M82

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M97

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