Clusters

Welcome to the Clusters image page. Here you’ll access some of my pictures, all of them taken with the new setup (QSI583WSG).


 Object: M13


M13Description
: One of the most astonishing objects, M13 is a classic target for beginners and experts alike. Never to forget the first time one sees it through the scope. It contains 600.000 stars in only 120 light years space. This object forms part of our galaxy, but it has its own orbit around us, taking half a billion years to complete it.

Technical data and processing: As one of the easiest targets in the sky, processing this baby was pretty straightforward. I used deconvolution to foster the stars in the cluster. Exposures were 180 seconds only, so guiding was not a problem.

Slide M13

 

 

 

 

 

 


 Object: M2


M2Description
: This globular lies in the constellation of Aquarius, and it’s one of the largest of our galaxy. It’s 37.500 lightyears away from us, and it’s pretty old.

Technical data: 2012/10/05. Meade LX-200 8″ at F7.7, QSI-583WSG with Astrodon RGB filters, guiding with the DSI Pro. Luminance and RGB frames (5 each), all of them 400-second long and binned 2X2. Adquired with Maxim/DL, registered with DeepSkyStacker, and processed with PixInsight.


 Object: M44, the Beehive cluster

 

M44 portrait signedDescription: This open clusters is easily seen with naked eye as a small fuzzy spot in the sky. This group of stars contains more than 1,000 of them. Young, main sequance stars are seen with their blue light, while some old, giant members shine with orange light.

Technical data: 2017/02/25. TS APO 80mm refractor at F4.7, QSI 583-WSG, RGB filters, guided with a DSI Pro. Binned 1×1. Subs of 300 seconds each: 4XL, 4XR, 4XB, 4XG. Reduced with Maxim/DL, stacked with DeepSkyStacker, and processed with PixInsight.

This is the technical data sheet:

slide M44

 

 

 

 

 

 


 Object: Double Cluster


double-cluster-signedDescription
: This is one of the most famous open clusters in the sky. In fact, as its name goes, it’s double, and it can be seen naked eye as a fuzy spot. It lies at about 7500 lightyears away from us, and it’s pretty young, probably no more than 13 million years old.

Technical data: 2016/10/28. TS APO 80mm refractor at F4.7, QSI 583-WSG, RGB filters, guided with a DSI Pro. Binned 1×1. Subs of 300 seconds each: 5XR, 4XB, 4XG. Reduced with Maxim/DL, stacked with DeepSkyStacker, and processed with PixInsight.

This is the technical data sheet:

slide double cluster

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 Object: Pleiades

 

pleiades cropped signatDescription: This is one of everyone’s favorite. About 400 lightyears from us, it contains between 500 and 1000 young, blue stars. Probably the nebulosity is not part of the cluster, and it is situated at the foreground.

Technical data: 2016/10/28. TS APO 80mm refractor at F4.7, QSI 583-WSG, LRGB filters, guided with a DSI Pro. Binned 1×1. Subs of 300 seconds each: 3XL, 3XR, 3XB, 3XG. Reduced with Maxim/DL, stacked with DeepSkyStacker, and processed with PixInsight.

This is the tech data sheet:

slide Pleiades